A Social Media Controversy: Facebook Screening

If you’re looking for a job these days, odds are your employer is going to look over your resume, cover letter, and oh yeah… your Facebook! Yep, that’s right. A series of surveys have reported recently that 91% of potential employers use Facebook to screen their applicants and two thirds have declined their applicants jobs based off what they found on their profiles.

Facebook screening has been widely controversial. Many people believe that their personal life should be kept separate from their professional lives.  However, employers use it as a way to get to know the applicant on a more personal level. It helps them to understand the person’s character better and then from there, they can determine whether or not they would be a good fit for their company.

In my opinion, your potential employer has every single right to look at your personal Facebook. It’s a great way to find out more about a person than just what jobs they’ve worked and what business related skills they can complete. Facebook was created as and still is the best networking tool out there. So while you may be just connected with your friends and family, it’s completely normal for people in your work circle to want to connect with you through Facebook. You should take that as a compliment.

And if we are being honest here, you shouldn’t be posting anything unprofessional on Facebook anyway! I don’t mean you have to be super formal on Facebook. No, I mean keep it clean, keep it classy. That means don’t post those selfies from last Saturday night after a long night of drinking and do not be cussing up a storm or starting fights with everyone.

That being said, don’t be afraid to be yourself. Like I said before, you’re employer wants to get a better idea of the kind of person you are and Facebook is a great place to individualize yourself and show the world who you truly are. Invest in what you love and let it show through your profile. If your passions show, you’re probably more likely to get picked for the job.

Sources:

http://www.u.arizona.edu/~koneill11/socialmedia/controversies.html

 

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